New short synopsis for my vampire novel

The Trick is an upmarket vampire story of time, hunger, love, and family, told alternately from the male and female protagonist’s point of view.

Vincent, a faithful Catholic, is two hundred seven-one years old, survives on the blood of living creatures, and can perform an amazing trick: he can reverse time—for fifteen minutes, anyway. Vincent is in a long, long quest for love and family, but each time he is foiled, until he meets Helen. He’s absolutely smitten; Helen is the woman he’s been looking for. There’s only one problem: Helen doesn’t want kids. She wants to be turned so that she could live forever with him, her true love, and children didn’t enter into her equation. At first Vincent refuses—there’s a painful cost to his form of mortality, and there’s also her soul to consider—but in the end, compromise wins the day. Together they form a family and can do more than they ever imagined.

What do you think?

I had a lot of fun with this novel. I definitely went rogue and deviated from vampire canon. I’m always looking for the loophole: Can a vampire have kids? Not in the traditional sense. Can a vampire be killed with poison? Yes! Does a vampire really lack a soul? The jury is still out. Can a vampire transfer powers? Maybe! Can a vampire turn back time? Yes!

Novel writing and the elusive third act

I am in the throes of novel writing.

I am working on the third act of The Trick, in which the heroine (Helen) goes a little baby-crazy, and her immortal vampire boyfriend must make a decision: start a family, or live without her.

I’m stuck because I don’t know how to write about baby-craziness. I never felt it myself. I have only witnessed it in others, and I fear turning it into a stereotype. Also, my novel is only at 48,000 words. It’s a wee bit too short.

In essence, I am stuck, with a fairly static third act. How do I make it as dynamic as the first two acts?

Act 1: They fall in love. Falling in love is fun to write about.
Act 2: They travel and enjoy the world. Vincent recalls previous girlfriends. Helen starts to worry about aging, and asks to be turned. They fight about it.
Act 3: Helen’s fear of aging and her desire for a family runs into conflict with Vincent’s non-human nature. Conflict is good but this act feels flat to me.

What do you think?

What kind of magic is this?

A snippet from my in-progress upmarket vampire story, The Trick

For a moment it all stopped and everything was silent. Helen listened for the tweet of a bird, the honk of traffic, or the chatter of a squirrel but heard only the sound of her own breathing. In the absence of external noise, the rhythmic beat of the pulse in her ear grew louder.

Helen marveled at the motionless tableaux. Gold and red autumn leaves were suspended in the air; a moth was caught in mid-flitter; even the feathery clouds, picking up the shine of the moon, had stopped moving. Helen touched a leaf hanging in mid-air and wondered, What kind of magic is this?